Welcome to The Trebus Project

 

 

In 2001 artist David Clegg met Sheila Hugo, an 87-year-old woman with dementia. At Sheila’s suggestion David began to piece together her life story – a story she admitted she could only remember ‘in bits’. Sheila’s life had somehow gone missing – her care notes said she was ‘depressed’ ‘demented’ and ‘alcoholic’… and not much else. David set up his tape recorder and after a little encouragement Sheila began; "I was born Sheila Val Jean Hugo, a descendant of Victor Hugo, writer of The Hunchback of Notre Dame." 

 

Sheila had been a friend to many famous actors and musicians; she dated lion tamers and walked hand in hand with the infamous Acid Bath Murderer. Her extraordinary story – which Sheila titled Dust on the Rubber Tree – took two years to piece together from hundreds of disarticulated, half-remembered fragments.

 

David started to visit care homes and hospitals in 2002 to meet more people with dementia and collect their stories. He named this work the Trebus Projects in honour of Edmund Trebus, a Polish war veteran, who filled his house with things the rest of the world had decided were rubbish, convinced that in time a use would be found for them. In his own way, David became a hoarder of the fragments and remains of the memories of people who have dementia. Working intensively and over long periods of time with the same people he built up a fascinating record of lives that would otherwise have been lost to history. What began as an art experiment has grown to become the largest archive of first person dementia narratives in the world.

 

Such characters as a member of the Hitler Youth, a cowboy, a professional boxer, a Bletchley park code-breaker and two self-proclaimed spies, told stories for the archive, as did others from the vast cast of ordinary people, housewives and odd-job men, ‘the disappeared’ who fill every care home.

 

The words and phrasing of the storytellers has been maintained throughout. Some stories place a high demand on the reader’s creative imagination and willingness to take an active interpretative stance to fill in the gaps and disentangle the real from the symbolic. ‘Ancient Mysteries’ – a title chosen for her own story by one of the participants – describes the feel of the project perfectly.

 

A series on Radio 4 and a recent hour-long special on Resonance FM have taken the Trebus Project to a wider audience.

 

David is currently working on ‘An Occasional Cobra / ROOM 21’: an interdisciplinary exploration of the narratives of a war correspondent, a diplomat who spent his childhood hiding from the Nazis, and a secretary at the Nuremberg trials, who, by coincidence, occupied, one after the other, the same room in a care home.

 

"The Trebus Project throws down a gauntlet to the world of contemporary art, so often obsessed with youth, sensationalism and celebrity."

Harry Eyres - Financial Times.